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How Bitcoin can help central banks

Many central banks for decades can not develop a predictable monetary policy, and this uncertainty is quite expensive for the economy. Lets try to solve that problem with Blockchain.

Soon after Ronald Reagan became president of the United States, former Fed chairman Arthur Burns visited the current chairman Paul Volcker. Burns came with a warning: the advisers of the newly elected president, led by Milton Friedman, want to replace the chairman of the Fed with a computer. Volcker opposed the idea that a complex financial system should be governed by simple, mechanical rules, and it did not take root.

Gone are decades, but the Fed is still too unpredictable. Its new leadership should reflect on ways to integrate the latest technological advances in order to make the monetary policy of the central bank more predictable.

The idea is not too radical: Milton Friedman and other economists have long argued for the confidence that arises with transparent and concrete rules. His “K-percent rule” prescribed annually to increase the money supply by a certain percentage, regardless of the policy of the central bank and the government.

Technological innovations, such as blocking and smart contracts, bring Friedman’s vision closer to implementation. Bitcoin, the most successful crypto currency, works on decentralized blockade. It has a certain level of inflation (generation of new coins) built in, and it will not change until most of the network agrees with this. A total of 21 million bitcoins will be produced; about every four years, the inflation rate is halved. Terms are laid down in the rules of the network, and they are very difficult to change after the beginning of its work.

Countries interested in conducting passive monetary policy can benefit from the experience of bitcoin. Such a policy will have some advantages of passive investment. Index funds save investors large sums on costs and commissions. The Fed and other central banks have their own fairly significant costs, which are reflected in the budget. However, uncertainty is much more expensive than economics. Due to unpredictability of the company’s policy, investments are postponed, long-term planning becomes more complicated.

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